Archives: Products

Red Curly

Red Curly Kale stems are purplish and the leaves are shaped like big oak leaves and colored a velvety gray green. The purple colors become richer after frost, when the flavor becomes sweeter. Surprisingly, the big leaves are very tender and delicious.

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Red Fresh Onion

Red onions are cultivars of the onion with purplish-red skin and white flesh tinged with red. These onions tend to be medium to large in size and have a mild to sweet flavor. They are often consumed raw, grilled or lightly cooked with other foods, or added as a decoration to salads.

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Red Russian

One of the hardiest and most tender-leaved of all kales, this variety is originally from Siberia and was brought to Canada by Russian traders around 1885. Its beautiful, frilly, purple-veined, blue-green leaves are tinged with red-purple and resemble oak leaves. Leaves have a mild, sweet flavor.

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Rosella (Dwarf Patio Tomato)

Rosella Purple provides intensely flavorful fruit that rivals the top favorite Cherokee Purple, but on dwarf 3-4′ tall plants.  Easy-to-care-for sturdy, productive tomatoes, its fruit features a rich deep purple exterior and rich crimson interior. Its complex flavor is the perfect combination of sweet and tart. Rosella Purple’s 6-12 oz. fruit is adored for its dense, juicy texture. Fantastic in salads, sandwiches, salsas, sliced with a touch of basil, or on its own.

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Sage

This herb, native to the Mediterranean, is sweet and somewhat bitter, with a pine-like flavor and aroma. It’s also often described as having eucalyptus and citrus notes. Sage can be found and used fresh or dried and ground, though as with most herbs, the fresh leaves offer considerably more flavor.

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Salsa (12 plants)

Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato – based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.

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San Marzano (Red Roma)

San Marzano Tomatoes are a plum tomato variety. They are a household name when it comes to making tomato sauce. They’re also particularly suitable for preparing peeled tomatoes, canned tomatoes, dried tomatoes, or tomato purée. In fact, skin comes off so easily from San Marzanos that they’re sometimes called, “The King of Peeled.”

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Scallions

Scallions are vegetables of various Allium onion species. Scallions have a milder taste than most onions. Their close relatives include garlic, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.

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Summer Squash – Yellow

Summer squash (also known as vegetable or Italian marrow), is a tender, warm-season vegetable that can be grown throughout the United States anytime during the warm, frost-free season. Summer squash differs from fall and winter squash in that it is selected to be harvested before the rind hardens and the fruit matures. It grows on bush-type plants that do not spread like the plants of fall and winter squash and pumpkin. A few healthy and well-maintained plants produce abundant yields.

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Sun Gold Cherry

One taste and you’ll know why this gold gem gets such high marks. The sweet-tart flavor is simply amazing. The beautiful golden-orange fruits are borne in large clusters. The flavor develops early, so this little tomato is great for snacking a week before full maturity, when it becomes very sweet and delicious.

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Sweet Mesclun

A tender, mild flavored blend of leaf veggies for early spring salads. Mouth watering, time-tested heirloom varieties. As beautiful in the garden as they are sweet in the salad bowl.

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Sweet Walla Walla Onions

Sweet Walla Walla Onions are the most common kinds of sweet onions. These onions lack the sharp, astringent taste of other onions and really do taste sweet. They are fantastic thinly sliced and served in salads or on top of sandwiches.

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Swiss Chard – Rainbow

Chard — sometimes called Swiss chard or rainbow chard (when it sports brightly colored stalks) — really is a relative of the beet. But unlike traditional beets — which put their energy into producing finger-staining roots, chard instead produces big, tender leaves and crunchy stalks. Chard has been around for thousands of years and likely originated in the Mediterranean, where it was in heavy culinary rotation until spinach came along. The taste depends on which part you eat, though not so much on which color. The large, firm leaves are mild, sweet, earthy and just slightly bitter; on the whole, it’s a bit milder than spinach. The stalks — which can be white, yellow, red, purple, pink, striped and so on — resemble flat celery with a sweet taste slightly reminiscent of beets.

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Thyme

Fresh or dried, thyme leaves and flowers lend a sprightly essence to flavoring casseroles, soups, stews, and sautéed vegetables. Chopped fresh or dried and combined with parsley and bay leaves, thyme is included in the French combination of herbs called bouquet garni, used to season stock, stews, and soups. Eggs, meats, fish, and bean dishes are all enhanced with a sprinkling of thyme.

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Tomatillos

Physalis ixocarpa, commonly called tomatillos, are a necessary ingredient of most Mexican salsas. Fruits are borne inside a paper “husk” (the calyx) and are also known as husk tomatoes. When fully ripe, the yellow to purple sweet fruits will swell and split the husks. However, most culinary uses, such as Mexican salsa verde, call for harvesting when the fruit is still green and tart. Tomatillos are easy to grow and very productive. The fruits will keep through the winter if stored loose in a cool place.

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Tomato – Champion (Red Slicer)

These high-yielding plants produce medium-sized fruits with delicious flavor throughout the summer.  This variety is a garden favorite, producing large yields into the fall. Use them for slicing on sandwiches and burgers or in salads. These tomatoes need at least one inch (2.5 cm) of water per week and prefer six hours or more of direct sun each day.

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